Howe, Richard

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                                   RICHARD HOWE
                                By Beatrice Jardine


Material is being collected for a book on local painter Richard Howe, says Arthur Flett. “I thought it was time a book was written about an extremely fine New Brunswick artist,” Flett said. Flett is preparing a book on his late old high school friend and wants to hear from people in the community, he said during a telephone interview from Windsor, Ontario.

Howe is a well-known local artist who died three years ago, Flett said.

Howe went to Mount Allison Art School in 1930 and to the Rhode Island School of Design. He attended the Ontario College of art in Toronto for four years. He graduated with honors.

He stayed in Montreal for two years where he worked at the Montreal art gallery on Sherbrooke Street with Arthur Lismer of the world-famous Group of Seven and Gooderick Roberts.

Paintings of St. Paul’s Church in Bushville and winter smelt fishing are among his better known works.

Howe’s paintings can be found at the veterans’ hospital in Saint John and in private collections on the Miramichi, and abroad. Louis Manny and Lord Beaverbrook bought Howe’s paintings. Howe’s work was on display for years at the French Fort Restaurant, which burned down years ago.

Different people commissioned designs and illustrations, one of which appears on the book Songs of the Miramichi.

Howe lived in Nordin, but went to the Rhode Island every summer, Flett added.

Flett wants to hear from anyone who purchased Howe’s work or knew Howe.

Flett is planning a trip to the Miramichi this July. If anyone has information they are asked to write to Flett at the School of Visual Arts, University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, N9B 3P4.


Source: Miramichi LeaderWeekend – June 15, 1990

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