Richard, Marcel Francois (Monsignor)

From NBGS Miramichi-WIKI

Jump to: navigation, search
                    Rogersville Monsignor Called Father of Acadie 

In the midst of the village of Rogersville the huge arch of the Assumption Monument dominates the skyline of this small Acadian village. The village is situated at the extreme south of Northumberland County, at the limits of Kent County. The history of the village and of the Assumption Monument is closely related to the life of Monsignor Marcel Francois Richard, father of the Acadian Renaissance. The village was founded in 1869, thanks to the workmen who came to lay tracks for the “Intercolonial” railway between Halifax and Montreal. Monsignor Richard, as parish priest of St. Louis de Kent named the village, formerly known as Carleton, Rogersville, in honour of the Bishop of Chatham, Bishop Rogers. Approximately ten men under the leadership of Michel Savoie came to the new community and started a wood trade in a virgin forest. Just as the name of the village is based on the Catholic religion of the Acadians who inhabit Rogersville, the daily life, recreation and even tourist attractions carry this mantle of their faith. The National Assumption Monument was a dream of this first cure (Priest) of Rogersville. His objective at the time was to honour the Blessed Virgin (Notre Dame de l’Assomption) in recognition for her special protection of the Acadian people. Construction began in 1910, under Msgr. Richard and is continually being built to this day. The giant arch, which marks the entrance to the Monument where Msgr. is buried, was built in 1955 to commemorate the bi-centennial of the expulsion of the Acadians in 1755. A fierce patriot, Msgr. Richard adopted the Tricolour (French Flag) for an Acadian flag with a Star of The Sea in the left hand corner. Special Chalice

Recognizing the problems of Acadians self identification years before others, Msgr. Richard went to Rome to request an Acadian bishop. Pope Pius X recognized the needs of the Acadians, presenting Msgr. Richard with a precious chalice which can be found in the Cathedral Museum in Moncton. Rogersville monsignor enjoyed a special affection for the Franco Americans. His love for these Acadian-rooted Americans still lives today. Their annual pilgrimages to the Monument in Rogersville are proof of his impact on Acadian life. These Americans have also made several gifts to the Rogersville monument grounds including the giant rosary which graces the entrance to the monument, the grotto of Notre Dame in 1958. In 1943, the Way of The Cross pathway was built The Assumption Monument has attained the status of a tourist attraction without losing its special qualities of love and patriotism. Well looked after lawns, quiet walkways and beautiful Acadian artwork are the outstanding qualities of Msgr. Richard’s final resting place. On his last trip to United States before his death in 1915, Msgr. Richard left his friends with the words, “I am returning to my country to die but you, my dear Acadians of America, you will come and pray at my tomb at the National Assomption Shrine.” - and they are still coming today, more than 65 years later.

Source: Northumberland News July 23, 1980

This text is available for use under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. For more information, select the following link: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/


                              MARCEL FRANCOIS RICHARD
                     Rogersville Monsignor Called Father of Acadie


In the midst of the village of Rogersville, the huge arch of the Assumption Monument dominates the skyline of this small Acadian village. The village is situated at the extreme south of Northumberland County, at the limits of Kent County. The history of the village and of the Assumption Monument is closely related to the life of Monsignor Marcel Francois Richard, father of the Acadian Renaissance.

The village was founded in 1869, thanks to the workmen who came to lay tracks for the Intercolonial railway between Halifax and Montreal. Monsignor Richard, as parish priest of St. Louis de Kent, named the village (formerly known as Carleton) Rogersville, in honour of the Bishop of Chatham, Bishop Rogers. Approximately ten men under the leadership of Michel Savoie came to the new community and started a wood trade in a virgin forest.

Just as the name of the village is based on the Catholic religion of the Acadians who inhabit Rogersville, the daily life, recreation and even tourist attractions carry this mantle of their faith. National Assumption Monument

The National Assumption Monument was a dream of this first curé (Priest) of Rogersville. His objective at the time was to honour the Blessed Virgin (Notre Dame de l’Assomption) in recognition for her special protection of the Acadian people. Construction began in 1910 under Msgr. Richard and is continually being built to this day.

The giant arch, which marks the entrance to the Monument where Msgr. is buried, was built in 1955 to commemorate the bi-centennial of the expulsion of the Acadians in 1755. A fierce patriot, Msgr. Richard adopted the Tricolour (French Flag) for an Acadian flag with a Star of The Sea in the left hand corner.

                                Special Chalice

Recognizing the problems of Acadians self-identification years before others, Msgr. Richard went to Rome to request an Acadian bishop. Pope Pius X recognized the needs of the Acadians, presenting Msgr. Richard with a precious chalice which can be found in the Cathedral Museum in Moncton.

The Rogersville monsignor enjoyed a special affection for the Franco Americans. His love for these Acadian-rooted Americans still lives today. Their annual pilgrimages to the Monument in Rogersville are proof of his impact on Acadian life. These Americans have also made several gifts to the Rogersville monument grounds including the giant rosary which graces the entrance to the monument, the grotto of Notre Dame in 1958. In 1943, the Way of The Cross pathway was built

The Assumption Monument has attained the status of a tourist attraction without losing its special qualities of love and patriotism. Well-looked-after lawns, quiet walkways and beautiful Acadian artwork are the outstanding qualities of Msgr. Richard’s final resting place.

On his last trip to United States before his death in 1915, Msgr. Richard left his friends with the words, “I am returning to my country to die but you, my dear Acadians of America, you will come and pray at my tomb at the National Assomption Shrine.” - and they are still coming today, more than 65 years later.


Source: Northumberland News July 23, 1980

This text is available for use under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. For more information, select the following link: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

Personal tools